Newly uncovered documents reveal that a former board member of the transnational abortion organization Planned Parenthood participated in horrific syphilis experiments using Guatemalans, without their consent, and infecting them with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), according to Live Action

These experiments, conducted between 1946 and 1948, were sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS). (PHS).

John C. Cutler was the principal investigator of this study and was assisted by his wife, Eliese Cutler, who later served on the board of directors of Planned Parenthood of Pennsylvania for more than 4 decades.

As the image below shows, Eliese participated as an assistant in the project and used her own cameras.

John C Cutler shows his wife’s help in the experiment (Image: National Archives).

Historian Susan Reverby reviewed the documents on file at the University of Pittsburgh and brought these terrible experiments to light after John Cutler’s death.

In 1967, Cutler became head of the population division of the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health and was reportedly a member of the American Eugenics Society in 1974.

In the experiments, they infected people with syphilis obtained from prostitutes. Those infected were military members, prisoners, and mentally ill patients without their consent, despite having been approved by Guatemalan authorities.

According to Reverby, the research team chose “men in the Guatemalan National Penitentiary, then in an army barracks, and men and women in the National Mental Health Hospital for a total of 696 subjects.

This creepy experimentation became known only in 2010; John Cutler died in 2003 and his wife Eliese in 2012…

The New York Times published details given by University of Virginia bioethicist John Arras. One of the victims, “She was first deliberately infected with syphilis and, months later, was given penicillin. After that, Dr. John C. Cutler … described her as being so sick that she ‘looked like she was going to die.’ Nevertheless, he inserted pus from a male victim of gonorrhea into her eyes, urethra and rectum. Four days later, infected in both eyes and bleeding from the urethra, she died”,

In 2010, after these experiments were made public, the U.S. government issued an apology, according to Reverby,

The worldwide outrage generated by the revealed documents prompted then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to issue a formal apology to the Guatemalan government.

The ethical violations of these experiments were described in an HHS document:

  • Deception at the time of conducting the experiments.
  • Using members of highly vulnerable populations as study subjects
  • The research was conducted without valid informed consent

The document also notes that the researchers and their superiors acknowledged the misconduct and that such abuses could not exist today in U.S. government-funded research.

Unfortunately, the latter is not being fulfilled since there are still unethical researches that continue to be financed by the U.S. government. Such is the case of the use of aborted baby parts for controversial experiments.